Articles Tagged with Boca Raton Florida Stockbroker Misconduct Lawyer

Published on:

Wonnie Short of Nashville, Tennessee submitted a Letter of Acceptance, Waiver and Consent (AWC) to the Department of Enforcement of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) for allegedly failing to ensure that a Wells Fargo Advisors LLC, (Wells Fargo) customer received the funds they were due from an annuity.

Between November 1996 and November 2011, Mr. Short was registered with Wells Fargo.  In October 2006, while Short was registered with Wells Fargo, a firm customer executed a will naming Mr. Short as executor. When the customer passed away in November 2008, Mr. Short petitioned the court and was appointed executor of the client’s estate. As executor, Mr. Short facilitated the pay out on three of the client’s annuities. For one of the annuities, the client’s estate was a 10% beneficiary and a local foundation, which was also a Wells Fargo customer, was a 90% beneficiary.

Continue reading →

Published on:

Ali Radfar of New York, New York submitted a Letter of Acceptance, Waiver and Consent (AWC) to the Department of Enforcement of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) for allegedly participating in an undisclosed private securities transaction in violation of NASD Rule 3040 and FINRA Rule 2010. Radfar entered the securities industry in July 2006 and was associates with FINRA member firm UBS Securities, LLC (UBS) from August 2012 through March 2015.

From August through October 2014, Mr. Radfar, with the help of another UBS member, participated in an undisclosed private securities transaction. FINRA alleged Mr. Radfar and the other firm member pooled personal funds with those of 12 other individuals whose investment they solicited. FINRA found a collective total of $300,000 was invested in SMS, an application-based game company. This investment, a private securities transaction, was made through two outside investment vehicles that were also formed by Mr. Radfar and the UBS representative.

Continue reading →

Published on:

Charles McInnis of Miami, Florida submitted a Letter of Acceptance, Waiver and Consent (AWC) to the Department of Enforcement of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) in connection with a contingent private placement offering of senior secured notes issued by a Columbian energy company. FINRA found Mr. McInnis did not understand the specific requirements of two exemptions from registration applicable for the private placement offering and failed to ensure that his customer’s purchases of the notes complied with the requirements of either of the exemptions.

From July 2009 through his resignation in August 2013, Mr. McInnis acted as President, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Compliance Officer for CP Capital Securities, Inc. (CP Capital). During this time period, Mr. McInnis was delegated responsibility to supervise CP Capital and its associated persons’ participation in a minimum contingency private placement offering. A private placement is generally an offering between only a select few investors in order to raise capital without registration with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Private placement offerings must satisfy certain conditions (safe harbors) to avoid registration with the SEC. For this offering, the Notes were unregistered securities exempt from the registration requirements of Section 5 of the Securities Act pursuant to the Rule144A safe harbor and the Regulation S exemption.

Continue reading →

Published on:

C. L. King & Associates, Inc. (CL King) of Albany, New York was named a Respondent in a Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) complaint that alleges CL King assisted customers in a scheme to profit from the deaths of vulnerable, elderly and terminally ill patients. The complaint alleges that CL King failed to establish and maintain proper supervisory procedures and failed to recognize suspicious activity in regard to a death-put investment scheme.

The FINRA investigators found that two CL King customers recruited terminally ill individuals by offering to pay them between $10,000 and $15,000 in exchange for their agreement to open a joint brokerage account. Between January 2012 and October 2013, CL King opened 36 accounts for its customers with individuals often signing agreements relinquishing their rights over, and responsibilities for, the assets in their accounts. Once the accounts were opened, the CL King customers used the joint accounts to purchase discounted corporate bonds, notes, and market-linked CDs (MLCDs) containing a survivor’s option or “death put,” which allowed the customers to redeem the investments for the full principal amount prior to maturity upon the death of a beneficial owner.

Continue reading →

Published on:

Leonard Goldberg of Rancho Mirage, California submitted an offer of settlement to the Department of Enforcement of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) for an alleged mutual fund “switching” scheme. In June 1986, the NYSE fined Mr. Goldberg $25,000 and suspended him for misconduct similar to these FINRA allegations. Mr. Goldberg acted as a GSR, GSP and OP for FINRA member firm Newport Coast Securities Inc. (Newport) from October 22, 2010 through his termination in November 2014 for failing to follow procedures.

FINRA investigators found that from August 2007 through August 2014, while associated with Newport and J.P. Turner & Company, LLP, Mr. Goldberg caused over $123,600 in losses to five customers in connection with 300 mutual fund and Exchange Traded Fund (ETF) transactions that netted him $77,900 in ill-gotten gains. FINRA alleged that over the five year period, Mr. Goldberg engaged in a practice of fraudulent and unsuitable short term switches of Class A mutual funds in client accounts.

Continue reading →

Published on:

Brent Burgesser of Chandler, Arizona submitted a Letter of Acceptance, Waiver and Consent (AWC) to the Department of Enforcement of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) for allegedly executing unsuitable mutual fund switches in the accounts of three customers. Burgesser became registered in the securities industry in May 2000 as a General Securities Representative (GSR).From October 2008, through July 2012, Mr. Burgesses was an associated member with Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC.

FINRA alleged that between January 2009 and May 2012, Mr. Burgesser effected 83 unsuitable mutual fund switches in the accounts of several customers, resulting in more than $63,700 in customer losses. Mutual fund “switching” is simply the process of transferring an investment from one fund to another, sometimes for good reason and other times to defraud clients. Some brokers attempt to effect numerous switches in client accounts in order to generate commissions. In the case of Mr. Burgesser, FINRA found that the former Wells Fargo representative generated approximately $109,500 in commissions for himself as a result of mutual fund “switching.”

Continue reading →

Published on:

Jeffrey Krupnick of Sarasota, Florida was named as a respondent in a Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) complaint for allegedly converting a client’s funds for his own personal use. FINRA alleged that Mr. Krupnick, between January 2012 and November 2014, while registered with FINRA member firm Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC (Wells Fargo) converted approximately$143,000 from his half-brother, a Wells Fargo customer.

FINRA alleged that due to over $50,000 in accumulated credit-card debt, Mr. Krupnick attempted to take advantage of his half-brother in a scheme to cover his losses. The FINRA investigators found that Mr. Krupnick opened several brokerage accounts for his half-brother for which he took control over and took funds from. FINRA alleged that Mr. Krupnick removed over $170,000 from 4 brokerage accounts he had created for his half-brother in October 2013. Furthermore, FINRA found that Mr. Krupnick named himself as the primary account holder on the joint accounts and assumed primary control over them even though he never contributed funds to the accounts and instead used the ill-gained funds to pay credit card bills, home payments, and other luxuries including a wedding in Hawaii.

Continue reading →

Published on:

Anthony Grey of Winter Park, Florida submitted a Letter of Acceptance, Waiver and Consent (AWC) to the Department of Enforcement of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) for allegedly charging excessive mark-ups to his clients and engaging in other fraudulent activity. Mr. Grey entered the securities industry in the early 1980s and later became associated with Gardnyr Michael Capital, Inc. (GMCI) in 1994.

During a routine FINRA member conduct examination in 2009, a FINRA examiner discovered a pattern of trades that revealed Mr. Grey artificially inflated prices of bonds for his retail customers. FINRA found that on ten occasions, Mr. Grey charged his customers unfair mark-ups ranging from 5.36% to 19.12%. In seven of the occasions FINRA further alleged that Mr. Grey charged fraudulently excessive mark-ups that he failed to disclose.

Continue reading →

Published on:

Christian Harkness of La Crosse, Wisconsin submitted a Letter of Acceptance, Waiver and Consent (AWC) to the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) for allegedly violating his broker-dealer conduct rules. Mr. Harkness entered the securities industry in 1998 as a General Securities Representative (GSR). Mr. Harkness became associated with UBS Financial Services Inc. (UBS) in 2007 and later in 2009 to Stifel, Nicolaus & Co. (Stifel) as a GSR.

FINRA found that Mr. Harkness violated NASD Rule 2370 and FINRA Rules 3240 and 2010 by borrowing money from a firm client on two occasions as well as failing to disclose outside business activities. FINRA alleged that Mr. Harkness did not receive written permission from his broker-dealer to participate in either of the activities and thereby violated FINRA conduct rules.

Continue reading →

Published on:

Glen Woodward of White Bluff, Tennessee, submitted a Letter of Acceptance, Waiver and Consent (AWC) to the Department of Enforcement for the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) for allegedly engaging in outside business activities without his firm’s approval.

Continue reading →