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Florida Wells Fargo Representative under Investigation for Converting Client Funds

Jeffrey Krupnick of Sarasota, Florida was named as a respondent in a Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) complaint for allegedly converting a client’s funds for his own personal use. FINRA alleged that Mr. Krupnick, between January 2012 and November 2014, while registered with FINRA member firm Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC (Wells Fargo) converted approximately$143,000 from his half-brother, a Wells Fargo customer.

FINRA alleged that due to over $50,000 in accumulated credit-card debt, Mr. Krupnick attempted to take advantage of his half-brother in a scheme to cover his losses. The FINRA investigators found that Mr. Krupnick opened several brokerage accounts for his half-brother for which he took control over and took funds from. FINRA alleged that Mr. Krupnick removed over $170,000 from 4 brokerage accounts he had created for his half-brother in October 2013. Furthermore, FINRA found that Mr. Krupnick named himself as the primary account holder on the joint accounts and assumed primary control over them even though he never contributed funds to the accounts and instead used the ill-gained funds to pay credit card bills, home payments, and other luxuries including a wedding in Hawaii.

In November 2014 Mr. Krupnick’s half-brother contacted Krupnick’s supervisors to notify Wells Fargo of unauthorized account withdrawals made by Krupnick and to report that he had not received statements for certain of his accounts. While under investigation, Mr. Krupnick claimed the funds in the joint accounts were undocumented “loans.” In May 2015, Mr. Krupnick reimbursed his half-brother $121,000.

FINRA Rules 2150(a) and 2010 set a standard for appropriate broker conduct. In this case, the FINRA Department of Enforcement is seeking multiple sanctions provided under FINRA Rule 8310(a), including monetary sanctions, be imposed and that Mr. Krupmick bear such costs of proceeding as are deemed fair and appropriate under the circumstances in accordance with FINRA Rule 8330.

FINRA rules require brokerage firms to establish and implement a reasonable supervisory system to protect customers from the risks associated with investing. The implementation of the rules requires supervisors to monitor their employees to ensure compliance with federal and state securities laws, securities industry rules and regulations, as well as the brokerage firm’s own policies and procedures. If broker-dealers and their supervisors fail to establish and implement these protective measures, they may be held liable to account holders for investment losses which stem from their employees’ misconduct. Therefore, investors who have suffered losses due to a brokerage firm’s failure to supervise the unsuitable recommendations of its representatives can bring forth claims to recover damages against firms, like Wells Fargo, which have a duty to supervise employees in order to protect their customers’ interests.

Have you suffered losses in your Wells Fargo account due broker misconduct and/or conversion of funds? If so, call Robert Pearce at the Law Offices of Robert Wayne Pearce, P.A. for a free consultation. Mr. Pearce is accepting clients with valid claims against Wells Fargo stockbrokers who may have engaged in misconduct and caused investors losses.

The most important of investors’ rights is the right to be informed!  This Investors’ Rights blog post is by the Law Offices of Robert Wayne Pearce, P.A., located in Boca Raton, Florida.  For over 35 years, Attorney Pearce has tried, arbitrated, and mediated hundreds of disputes involving complex securities, commodities and investment law issues.  The lawyers at our law firm are devoted to protecting investors’ rights throughout the United States and internationally!  Please visit our website, www.secatty.com, post a comment, call (800) 732-2889, or email Mr. Pearce at pearce@rwpearce.com for answers to any of your questions about this blog post and/or any related matter.